A Love Story by Karen Shughart

“He alone is great who turns the voice of the wind into a song made sweeter by his own loving.” Khalil Gibran

In the fall of 2016 my mother suffered a series of strokes and went into a nursing home in Pittsburgh, where she lived. My father had died; I became her power of attorney and had her mail forwarded to me here in New York. That December she received a letter with a return name and address that I vaguely recognized. I opened it.

It was letter from a man named Norge Santin, who was inquiring after my mother, our family, and Leonard, my mother’s brother. Then I remembered that Norge was a childhood friend of theirs when they were growing up in Ohio.

My uncle had died earlier that month; after reading the letter I wrote back, apprising Norge of his passing and my mother’s health issues. He responded quickly, saddened by my news. He knew who I was, he wrote, we’d met when my parents lived in Ohio shortly after I was born.

What ensued was a friendship between us, for a time through letters, then by email and phone. Norge grieved with me when my mother passed three years ago and comforted me when one of my brothers died last summer. Each time we made contact, he ended by offering prayers and blessings for my uncle and mother and sending love to me and my family.

He filled in some blanks. I learned that he and my uncle were not just friends, but best friends, starting in third grade. When the two young men graduated from high school they were drafted, it was World War II, and their college plans were placed on hold. Norge returned from the war, got his degrees, married, and had children.

Leonard was not so lucky. Suffering a breakdown during the war from which he would never recover, he spent his remaining years in and out of VA hospitals and group homes. My siblings and I knew his tragic story; our parents made sure he was always part of our lives. What I hadn’t known was that Norge remained a devoted friend to Leonard throughout his life. During visits when Leonard was withdrawn and unresponsive, he’d sit quietly with him, holding his hand.

Eventually our family moved Leonard to Pittsburgh. Norge, despite living in Ohio, continued visiting my uncle until Leonard decided that he no longer wished to see him. Maybe it was too painful to be with Norge, we’ll never know. Norge respected his wishes and never contacted him again, but his love for his friend never ceased; he contacted my mother to receive updates, up until the time when I opened that letter.

By 2019 Norge’s health had declined, he had trouble reading emails and spoke haltingly over the phone. I wanted to meet this man I’d grown so fond of, so that October my husband and I drove to Ohio to visit Norge and his wife, Therese. We were warmly welcomed and spent a lovely afternoon; all of us feeling as though we’d known one another forever.

Because of Covid there were no return visits, but we talked regularly, most recently just before Thanksgiving when I promised to call again before Christmas. Before we ended that conversation, Norge confided he thought his time was near. I told him I loved him, he said he loved me back.

Two weeks ago, I received a call from one of Norge and Therese’s daughters that broke my heart. This tender, humble, gentle and honorable man had passed and Therese, despite her own grief (they were married for 68 years), wanted to make sure I knew. His death, at 94, occurred almost four years to the day of the death of my uncle.

I’m so glad I decided to open that letter, my life is immeasurably enriched because of it. Therese and I share a strong bond; I’ll keep in touch with her and visit when it’s safe. And I miss Norge already. Rest in peace, dear friend.

10 thoughts on “A Love Story by Karen Shughart

  1. Dear Karen,
    Thank- you for the heartfelt tribute to my father. Our whole family enjoyed reading it. My dad used to talk about his childhood friend, Leonard. They had a lot of fun playing together and growing up together doing some very silly things. He was a serious and quiet sort of guy, but he would light up and laugh when he told stories of their adventures. Happy Holidays!
    Sincerely, his daughter Gina

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  2. Thank you for sharing your story and relationship with Norge and Therese. Because we are related we always appreciate hearing about your wonderful family. Thank you. Love, Linda and Alan

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  3. Karen,
    Thank you for sharing this beautiful story. It is renewing to know that there are still selfless people in this world who value kindness and strive to keep strong ties of friendship and devotion an important part of their lives.

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  4. Thanks to all of you who have commented on my blog. It was probably the most difficult one I’ve ever written because it is so personal. Your feedback means a lot!
    Happy holidays to all!

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  5. Karen, I’m so sorry about Norge but what a beautiful tribute. It is a great tragedy that we are losing an entire generation of strong, brave, and humble people. Their stories and experiences are important to tell and truly make up the fabric of our country. Thank you for such a lovely story.

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  6. Wow! That was just beautiful, Karen. That is the kind of love story any of us can relate to. It is ageless. Thank you for sharing.

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